Health and Wellbeing

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is more than simply eating eating and drinking the right foods. There are many ways you can look after your mind and body, and we'll help you discover the most suitable ways for your life.

  1. Sweet dreams – what to eat for a good night’s sleep

    Whether because of natural changes in our health or side effects of medication, many of us find it more difficult to get to sleep as we age. But there are some simple things you can do to drift off more easily – including enjoying a relaxing meal. To get to sleep, our bodies rely on a hormone called melatonin, which controls our sleeping and waking cycles. For example, during daylight hours, our body clock cuts down how much melatonin we produce to help us feel awake. Production of melatonin increases into the evening as we prepare to rest, and reaches its highest levels at night to keep us asleep until morning.
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  2. Diet and Macular Degeneration

    Just as with the rest of the body, a balanced diet can help our eyes stay strong and healthy in later life. Here, we look at the vitamins and essential nutrients that can help combat macular degeneration. The macula is the central part of the retina, which is responsible for the type of sight we need for detailed tasks such as reading and recognising faces. In Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), the cells in the macula gradually stop working, damaging central vision.
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  3. Encouraging a healthy appetite

    In later life, it’s not uncommon to have a smaller appetite than when you were younger. But it’s still important to make sure you eat enough to stay strong and healthy. This week, we share our five top tips for maintaining a healthy appetite. From less sensitive taste buds to badly fitting dentures and medication side effects, there’s a whole range of things that can affect our appetite as we get older. Most of us know how difficult it can be to eat when you don’t feel hungry. But with our simple tips, you can make sure you get the nutrients you need to stay healthy – and find your way back to truly enjoying meals again.
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  4. Better mealtimes for you and your loved one

    It’s Carers Week, and we’re sharing our top tips for making sure you and the person you care for enjoy a balanced diet. Being a carer for a loved one comes with a whole host of challenges – particularly when it comes to mealtimes. Whether because of illness, disability or becoming less active, many people can find it difficult to eat or find that their dietary needs or appetite have changed. Here a few ways to make mealtimes easier, and help the person you care for get the nutrients they need:
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  5. Think positive – lifestyle tips for a healthy brain

    We’re all used to hearing about how exercise and a balanced diet help keep our hearts healthy. But a healthy lifestyle is also essential for looking after your brain. Here we explore some tips that could reduce your chances of developing Alzheimer’s in later life. Alzheimer’s disease affects the brain, causing a range of symptoms such as memory loss, difficulty concentrating and becoming confused and disorientated. Although no main cause has been found, people who keep their blood pressure, cholesterol and weight in check are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s as they get older.
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  6. Get active this spring

    Along with a balanced diet, regular exercise is really important for staying happy and healthy as we age. Here we look at some popular ways to stay fit – ranging from outdoor hobbies to group classes. Getting older can sometimes make it difficult to exercise regularly. But staying active can have so many benefits. From simple things like getting out of your chair more easily, to staying steady on your feet and avoiding falls. This doesn’t mean we all need to take up jogging round the park. There are plenty of gentle forms of exercise that make a real difference to your health – and provide great reasons for leaving the house and meeting new people.
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  7. Living well with dementia: foods to avoid

    Following a nutritious, balanced diet is important for everyone. But for older people with dementia, eating the right foods – and avoiding the wrong ones – can make a real difference to their overall health and happiness. To stay healthy and fight off illnesses, the brain and the body need to get all the right nutrients. D
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  8. Dementia and a balanced diet

    People with dementia often experience various problems with eating and drinking. This can have a negative impact on a person’s health and on some of the symptoms of their dementia. It can result in weight loss and even worsen confusion as well as causing other health problems. If you are caring for someone with dementia there are things you can do to support them. Don’t forget, if you are at all worried about the person you are caring for, speak to your GP for help.
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  9. Cholesterol and You

    Cholesterol is a word that we hear an increasing amount as we age, but many people are still unaware of what cholesterol is and the dangers it can pose. Cholesterol is an essential fatty substance that is carried around the body in your bloodstream. When cholesterol combines with proteins they become lipoproteins. There are two main types, which have very different effects on the body:
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  10. Keep heart healthy with National Heart Month

    February is National Heart Month and a reminder of how important it is to look after our hearts.  Run by the British Heart Foundation, the initiative is held every year to raise awareness of the fight against cardiovascular disease, with the aim of keeping more hearts beating for longer.
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