Articles & stories

  1. Eat and exercise your way to better mental health

    Suffering from depression and anxiety becomes even more common as we get older. It’s an illness often triggered by age-related risk factors such as having a debilitating medical condition, disability, loved ones dying, retirement and loneliness. And when things go wrong with your mental health, every aspect of your life is affected – with the usual symptoms being a lack of energy, low motivation, disrupted sleep and a poor appetite. Physical complaints such as arthritis pain or worsening headaches are also linked to depression.
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  2. Chocolate: a little bit of what you fancy is good for you

    Chocolate is one of the most popular foods in the world – in the UK alone, we eat an average of 11kg each per year. But as well as being a sweet treat, chocolate is claimed to have lots of health benefits, including lowering blood pressure, relieving stress and fighting heart disease. Chocolate is made from cocoa beans – the seeds of the cocoa tree. It was the Mayans of Central America who first discovered the beans could be eaten; making drinks from cocoa powder mixed with water, flavoured with vanilla or chilli. The Spanish brought chocolate back to Europe in the 1500s, and by the middle of the 17th century, hot chocolate was being drunk in fashionable ‘chocolate houses’ across the continent. But it wasn’t until the 1800s when cocoa was used to make the chocolate bars we know and love today.
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  3. Some like it hot: celebrating National Curry Week

    Tikka Masala or Jalfrezi? Korma or Balti? In the UK today, we’re eating more curry than ever before. But when did our love of these spiced, aromatic dishes begin? With National Curry Week in full swing, there’s no better time to find out. Many of us might think that curry only really became popular in the UK thanks to the growing number of people from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh who settled in cities up and down the country from the 1950s to the 1970s. But curry actually first came to Britain centuries earlier. And since then, there has been a fusion of British and Asian ingredients and recipes that have lead to the creation of some of our best-loved dishes.
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  4. Go to work on an egg - celebrating British Egg Week

    The humble egg has been a staple of our diet for thousands of years. And, as British Egg Week gets cracking this week, it’s the perfect time to indulge in this versatile and nutritious food. From sandwiches to soufflés, quiches to cakes, for breakfast, lunch and dinner – eggs are the essential ingredient in countless dishes. Although hens eggs are the staple, you'll also find quail eggs on the supermarket shelf (great for canapés) as well as large duck eggs with their rich tasting, deep orange yolk. For something really extraordinary – you might be lucky enough to come across an ostrich egg. It weighs a massive 2kg, is the equivalent of 24 hen eggs, and takes two hours to hard-boil!
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  5. Start the day right with Oakhouse

    The new Oakhouse Foods home meals range for the winter season is out now, and includes a brand new breakfast range aimed at encouraging those living alone to start their day with a substantial meal. Research has shown that eating a good breakfast provides the body and brain with fuel for the day, and can have long term health benefits too. Featuring 2 new hot porridges and a choice of cooked breakfasts, the Oakhouse selection offers an interesting variety of dishes for customers to choose from.
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  6. Hearty eating that’s great for your ticker

    It's World Heart Day this week and the ideal time to double check that we’re looking after our hearts. Keeping active is one of the most fun parts of it. But the good news is, your diet can also really benefit your heart – even if you already have a heart condition. Thankfully it’s not too complicated. All you have to do is aim for a balanced diet, naturally packed full of nutrient-rich ingredients. So when choosing your ready meals make sure they often include:  - plenty of fruit and vegetables - plenty of starchy foods - low fat milk and dairy - some meat and fish, or eggs, beans and other non-dairy protein sources - lower fat, salt and sugar values
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  7. Warm up with our delicious new Winter Wonders

    With the cold nip of winter already in the air, now’s the perfect time to keep warm and toasty indoors and look through our latest brochure. It’s packed with a variety of wholesome and delicious home delivered ready meals – which makes stocking up on easy-to-prepare dinners simple and convenient. Along with all the classic favourites such as stews and casseroles, hearty soups and comforting hot desserts, the Oakhouse Foods chefs have been busy creating some tempting new recipes that are perfect for the chilly nights ahead. You’ll find some of these in our new Winters Wonders Pack, which offers a wonderful choice of recipes for this season including: Steak Diane, Mediterranean Chicken, Luxury Roast Pork, Fish & Potato Gratin and Four Cheese Ravioli.
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  8. The veggie route to a healthier diet

    If you reckon a meal’s not a proper meal without some kind of meat in it, you’re not alone. But with vegetables playing such a crucial role in a nutritious, balanced diet, it’s often a good idea to make a few days a week meat-free – and seeing how that makes you feel. As we get older, our energy levels and appetite tend to change. So if you’re not eating as much as before, what you do eat needs to be rich in vitamins, minerals, fibre and ‘good’ fats. A diet based mainly on starchy foods such as potatoes, whole-grain bread, rice and pasta, along with plenty of fruit, vegetables and nuts, ticks all the healthy boxes and provides your essential ‘five-a-day’. And whether they’re raw, cooked, sliced, diced, stewed, mashed or puréed – enjoying vegetarian food is easier than you think.
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  9. Top tips for healthy joints

    If you like to stay active, keeping your joints healthy can be important. Although they won’t prevent more serious conditions such as arthritis, the following tips can help keep your joints in good condition – so you can carry on doing the things you love. From getting out of bed to holding a pen, our joints are essential for everything we do. But when we age, our joints can become stiff and painful – whether from wear and tear of bones and cartilage, or different types of arthritis. The good thing is, there are some simple things you can do to keep your joints strong and flexible in later life.
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  10. Healthy gut, healthy life

    Good digestive health is vital for our overall wellbeing and strengthening our immunity to illness and infections. So understanding what foods and drinks help or hinder our digestion can make you feel better in lots of ways. Fibre A diet rich in fibre or ‘roughage’ helps prevent constipation and lowers the risk of chronic diseases. For a healthy bowel, aim to eat 30g of fibre a day from a variety of foods such as: wholemeal bread, cereal, brown rice, fruit, vegetables, beans and oats. Take a look at our Tuscan Bean Casserole or Chilli Con Carne & Rice – for satisfying suppers, packed with fibre.
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