Articles & stories

  1. Better mealtimes for you and your loved one

    It’s Carers Week, and we’re sharing our top tips for making sure you and the person you care for enjoy a balanced diet. Being a carer for a loved one comes with a whole host of challenges – particularly when it comes to mealtimes. Whether because of illness, disability or becoming less active, many people can find it difficult to eat or find that their dietary needs or appetite have changed. Here a few ways to make mealtimes easier, and help the person you care for get the nutrients they need:
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  2. Super summer smoothies

    As the weather gets warmer, we take a look at some refreshing, flavour-packed smoothies to help you keep cool.  If you find getting your 5 a day can sometimes be a chore, try drinking, rather than eating them. Digging out the blender and making a juice or smoothie is a simple, tasty way to pack loads of fruit (and even vegetables) into your daily diet. And because smoothies are thicker than other liquids, they’re also a great refreshment option for people with difficulties swallowing.
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  3. Spice up your summer – and get healthy too!

    Spicy food can be just the thing in the warmer weather but there’s another great reason to try something new and exotic. From soothing joint pain to easing indigestion, we look at the surprising health benefits thought to be behind some of our favourite spices. They are the secret behind some of our most popular ready meals, from curries and Mediterranean classics to warming desserts. But far from simply adding mouth-watering flavours, these small yet powerful seasonings are believed to be good for us, too.
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  4. Think positive – lifestyle tips for a healthy brain

    We’re all used to hearing about how exercise and a balanced diet help keep our hearts healthy. But a healthy lifestyle is also essential for looking after your brain. Here we explore some tips that could reduce your chances of developing Alzheimer’s in later life. Alzheimer’s disease affects the brain, causing a range of symptoms such as memory loss, difficulty concentrating and becoming confused and disorientated. Although no main cause has been found, people who keep their blood pressure, cholesterol and weight in check are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s as they get older.
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  5. Oakhouse Foods expands puréed meals range

    This article was published in 2015. Read a more recent article about our puréed range. Oakhouse Foods has developed its offering of puréed dishes suitable for a Category C texture modified diet, in a move designed to bring a better standard of food to those with limited mealtime options. Company founder Tony Blood said, “Food choices for those with dysphagia are restricted but we believe that puréed dishes can and should be appealing, enjoyable and satisfying just like any other meal. Our range of puréed meals has already proved to be extremely popular, and we’ve now added more choice including mini meals and desserts as there is a clear need for good quality and varied puréed options. Being able to enjoy an appetising meal is vital to a person’s quality of life, and we’ve taken great care to make our food is as appealing and as tasty as possible.”
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  6. Going gluten-free the simple way

    For those who follow a diet without gluten – whether because of Coeliac disease or a wheat intolerance – finding quick and easy dinners can be a challenge. But with Oakhouse, there’s no need to spend hours in the kitchen each day, thanks to our selection of delicious, gluten-free ready meals. Many people who have to avoid ingredients containing gluten – such as wheat, barley and rye – choose to prepare meals from scratch. However, for anyone who finds it difficult to cook each day, it isn’t always easy to find simple-to-make, gluten free dishes. That’s because gluten can crop up where you least expect it, in anything from soups and sauces to some supermarket ready meals.
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  7. Enjoying mealtimes with dysphagia

    Having a stock of easy-to-prepare, puréed ready meals can be a real help if you suffer with dysphagia. It means that you or the person preparing your meals can spend less time in the kitchen preparing food of the right consistency, and more time making sure you get the nutrients you need.
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  8. Get active this spring

    Along with a balanced diet, regular exercise is really important for staying happy and healthy as we age. Here we look at some popular ways to stay fit – ranging from outdoor hobbies to group classes. Getting older can sometimes make it difficult to exercise regularly. But staying active can have so many benefits. From simple things like getting out of your chair more easily, to staying steady on your feet and avoiding falls. This doesn’t mean we all need to take up jogging round the park. There are plenty of gentle forms of exercise that make a real difference to your health – and provide great reasons for leaving the house and meeting new people.
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  9. Eat allergy aware - easy meal planning with Oakhouse Foods

    Having a food allergy can make it stressful to find safe, tasty meals – particularly if it’s difficult for you to prepare food from scratch. This Allergy Awareness Week, Oakhouse Foods makes it simple to enjoy delicious ready meals that suit your diet. Many people who have allergies choose to prepare their food themselves, so they can be absolutely sure they don’t contain allergens. But for older people living at home, cooking meals each day can become a challenge.
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  10. Eat well, age well - getting all the right nutrients

    From loss of appetite to limited mobility, old age can bring physical challenges that make it difficult to enjoy a healthy, balanced diet. Here we look at essential nutrients that can help combat age-related illnesses, and guidance about including them in day-to-day meals. A vital part of nutritional management for older people is including the right vitamins and minerals in their diet. These are found in a whole range of ingredients, from meat and fish to fruit, green vegetables and cereals.
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